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  • Peruvian Military Protects Soldiers and Civilians from Ebola Virus

    first_imgHealth authorities in West Africa have been fighting the current outbreak of the deadly virus for almost a year. It began in Guinea in December 2013 and then spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nigeria, Senegal, and Mali later reported infected cases, but have since been declared disease-free. The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Peacekeeping Operations Unit, and the Ministry of Health are coordinating the new protocols. The Joint Staff announced that the Armed Forces are deploying strict procedures for Troops coming home from peacekeeping missions in Africa and Haiti, even though there were no reported cases of infection there. Soldiers returning from such missions will undergo tests at the National Institute of Health to determine if they are infected with the virus. The procedures are designed to protect the health of Troops assigned to regions where the virus is present, as well as those returning from areas where it has not been detected. Preventing the virus from spreading is crucial because of its high fatality rate. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the fatality rate for Ebola in Africa had risen to 70 percent in October. The procedures are proving to be effective. As of late January, no cases of Ebola had been reported in Latin America. On January 14, the Soldier died while being treated at the Central Military Hospital, but medical tests determined Rengifo Clavijo had been infected with Malaria, not Ebola. By Dialogo February 10, 2015 Tragic Death of a Soldier not connected to Ebola In October, President Ollanta Humala signed a decree ordering the deployment of measures to prevent Ebola from entering Peru. In Africa, Peru has Military observers deployed in the Ivory Coast and Troops dedicated to training the civilian police force in Liberia, where the second-highest number of confirmed Ebola cases were reported. Soldiers returning from such missions will undergo tests at the National Institute of Health to determine if they are infected with the virus. The procedures are designed to protect the health of Troops assigned to regions where the virus is present, as well as those returning from areas where it has not been detected. “Like other countries in the region that sent Military forces as part of a humanitarian aid mission, Peru has been implementing protocols and disease-prevention programs for which the troops are receiving ongoing training on protective measures against Ebola. They have also been issued personal protective equipment for cases involving the potential presence of the disease in their areas of responsibility,” explained Fernando Palomino Milla, a retired Rear Admiral of the Peruvian Navy. The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Peacekeeping Operations Unit, and the Ministry of Health are coordinating the new protocols. Peruvian Military authorities were prepared to tread a possible case of Ebola in early January. Providing health care to protect Troops and civilians Preventing the virus from spreading is crucial because of its high fatality rate. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the fatality rate for Ebola in Africa had risen to 70 percent in October. Another group of Peruvian Soldiers is scheduled to return from a peacekeeping mission to Africa after August 1, where Peru has a total 39 officers and Soldiers deployed. In Africa, Peru has Military observers deployed in the Ivory Coast and Troops dedicated to training the civilian police force in Liberia, where the second-highest number of confirmed Ebola cases were reported. On December 26, Peruvian Army officer Mario Rengifo Clavijo, who had recently returned from a mission in Africa, was hospitalized with symptoms that were similar to those of Ebola, including high fever, nausea, and weakness. The virus is transmitted through direct contact with blood, bodily fluids, and the tissues of infected animals and people. To protect the Troops and the civilian population, the Peruvian Military is carefully screening Soldiers returning from United Nations peacekeeping missions in Africa for the deadly Ebola virus. To protect the Troops and the civilian population, the Peruvian Military is carefully screening Soldiers returning from United Nations peacekeeping missions in Africa for the deadly Ebola virus. “Like other countries in the region that sent Military forces as part of a humanitarian aid mission, Peru has been implementing protocols and disease-prevention programs for which the troops are receiving ongoing training on protective measures against Ebola. They have also been issued personal protective equipment for cases involving the potential presence of the disease in their areas of responsibility,” explained Fernando Palomino Milla, a retired Rear Admiral of the Peruvian Navy. Providing health care to protect Troops and civilians On December 26, Peruvian Army officer Mario Rengifo Clavijo, who had recently returned from a mission in Africa, was hospitalized with symptoms that were similar to those of Ebola, including high fever, nausea, and weakness. In October, President Ollanta Humala signed a decree ordering the deployment of measures to prevent Ebola from entering Peru. Another group of Peruvian Soldiers is scheduled to return from a peacekeeping mission to Africa after August 1, where Peru has a total 39 officers and Soldiers deployed. The Joint Staff announced that the Armed Forces are deploying strict procedures for Troops coming home from peacekeeping missions in Africa and Haiti, even though there were no reported cases of infection there. The virus is transmitted through direct contact with blood, bodily fluids, and the tissues of infected animals and people. Health authorities in West Africa have been fighting the current outbreak of the deadly virus for almost a year. It began in Guinea in December 2013 and then spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nigeria, Senegal, and Mali later reported infected cases, but have since been declared disease-free. The procedures are proving to be effective. As of late January, no cases of Ebola had been reported in Latin America. Peruvian Military authorities were prepared to tread a possible case of Ebola in early January. Tragic Death of a Soldier not connected to Ebola On January 14, the Soldier died while being treated at the Central Military Hospital, but medical tests determined Rengifo Clavijo had been infected with Malaria, not Ebola. My comment is that all young Peruvian men should go into military service.last_img read more

  • Here’s why Angel Stadium is worth less than a Dana Point resort or Mike Trout

    first_imgHowever, let me suggest two similar-sized deals with certain relevance to this property to help you understand the math.It’s said that Moreno’s group hopes to turn the stadium and land into a must-visit attraction. Well, the must-see Monarch Beach Resort in Dana Point recently sold for $497 million. How can a 400-room hotel be worth more than a 40,000-seat stadium plus a developable parking lot?For starters, the resort sits on 162 acres, a comparable plot to the stadium parcels. Note: Anaheim’s land does not offer Pacific Ocean views. PreviousAnthony Rendon smiles as he poses for photographs in Angel Stadium in Anaheim after he was introduced as the newest member of the Los Angeles Angels on Saturday December 14, 2019. Rendon helped lead the Washington Nationals to the World Series championship and reached an agreement on a seven-year, $245 million contract with the Los Angeles Angels. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)Pool at the Monarch Beach Resort in Dana Point. (File photo)The Monarch Bay Beach Club, previously called the Monarch Bay Club, has had a multimillion-dollar renovation makeover in Dana Point. The club offers private access to the beach where umbrellas, towels and chair service is complimentary and available to resort guests and members. Elements of the club’s redesign include: new canopies, lawn furniture, better accessibility and enhanced ocean views. (Courtesy of Monarch Bay Beach Club) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Monarch Bay Beach Club, previously called the Monarch Bay Club, has had a multimillion-dollar renovation makeover in Dana Point. The club offers private access to the beach where umbrellas, towels and chair service is complimentary and available to resort guests and members. Elements of the club’s redesign include: new canopies, lawn furniture, better accessibility and enhanced ocean views. (Courtesy of Monarch Bay Beach Club)Local elementary, middle school and high school students will perform a “Merry Monarch” concert on Sunday, Dec. 15, at Monarch Beach Resort in Dana Point. Proceeds will support Capistrano Unified School District. (Courtesy of CUSD)Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Wednesday, December 4, 2019. The City of Anaheim and the Angels reached agreement that will keep the Angels playing in Angel Stadium for another 30 years, and the city would sell the stadium and 133 acres around it to a business partnership including team owner Arte Moreno for about $325 million. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Wednesday, December 4, 2019. The City of Anaheim and the Angels reached agreement that will keep the Angels playing in Angel Stadium for another 30 years, and the city would sell the stadium and 133 acres around it to a business partnership including team owner Arte Moreno for about $325 million. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)The Big A at Angel Stadium of Anaheim sits on the east side of the parking lot next to the 57 Freeway. The giant A, complete with light-up halo, was the Angel’s scoreboard when the stadium opened in 1966. The $1 million, 230 feet tall scoreboard was the largest built at the time. The Big A was moved to it’s present location in 1980. (File photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)Mike Trout (27) of the Angels watches the ball go over the fence after hitting a two-run home run in the seventh inning against the Dodgers during a Freeway Series game at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Monday, June 10, 2019. (Photo by Leonard Ortiz, Orange County Register/SCNG)Angels Manager Joe Maddon does an interview with MLB Network after a press conference introducing him as the new team manager at Angel Stadium in Anaheim, CA, on Thursday, Oct 24, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)Albert Pujols #5 of the Los Angeles Angels hits an RBI single against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the fourth inning at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Wednesday, August 14, 2019. Pujols’ single, career hit No. 3,167, made him the all-time hits leader among players born outside the United States, passing Adrian Beltre. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)The Brown family, of Huntington Beach, heads into Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Wednesday, August 14, 2019. Anaheim officials expect to sit down with the Angels in the next 60 days to look at the team’s development proposal, and the city has added a consultant to its team for the purpose. Anaheim hopes to see stadium lease proposal from Angels by October. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)Anaheim Mayor Harry Sidhu holds a press conference to discuss the Angel Stadium lease talks on the 7th floor of Anaheim City Hall in Anaheim on Tuesday, August 27, 2019. (Photo by Kevin Sullivan, Orange County Register/SCNG)Anthony Rendon smiles as he poses for photographs in Angel Stadium in Anaheim after he was introduced as the newest member of the Los Angeles Angels on Saturday December 14, 2019. Rendon helped lead the Washington Nationals to the World Series championship and reached an agreement on a seven-year, $245 million contract with the Los Angeles Angels. (Photo by Mark Rightmire, Orange County Register/SCNG)Pool at the Monarch Beach Resort in Dana Point. (File photo)NextShow Caption1 of 13Pool at the Monarch Beach Resort in Dana Point. (File photo)Expand Why is Angel Stadium and its surrounding land worth less than an Orange County luxury resort or Mike Trout?The city of Anaheim is selling its baseball stadium and the parking lots around it for up to $325 million, with various unspecified caveats. On Friday, Dec. 20, city council will vote on selling the property to a mysterious group headed by Arte Moreno, owner of the facility’s main tenant: the Los Angeles Angels.Since the outline of the deal was announced earlier this month, there’s been plenty of conjecture about the true value of the 153-acre, city-owned property. If you think it’s hard guessing who’ll will the next World Series, appraising real estate is as much art as it is science. Related linksAnaheim should tell the Angels ‘good riddance’Why most pro athletes — including Mike Trout — are worth every penny of their big money salariesLansner: Error, Anaheim! City booted stadium deal with AngelsDana Point’s five-star Monarch Beach Resort sold for $497 million10 business trends every Southern Californian should be thankful for Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Plus, the resort owns an 18-hole golf course and banquet halls, not to mention it controls a 6-acre beach club. And it’s seen $56 million in renovations in recent years.Oh, please note the resort is up and running and generating profits. According to one analysis, the resort had a positive cash flow of $24 million in this year’s first nine months after making $24 million in all of 2018.City documents show Angel Stadium was, at best, a breakeven proposition for Anaheim. So Moreno’s group won’t instantly be making money on its sizable purchase.Or if you want to discuss athletic valuations, consider baseball superstar Mike Trout’s latest contract with the Angels – 12 years of pay worth $430 million. Do not think for a minute that Moreno is “losing” that money.It doesn’t cost the Angels much more cash to leverage Trout’s skill, not to mention his fame, to win ballgames and sell tickets, merchandise, sponsorships and other team-related goodies. It may be hard for Moreno to quantify every last penny of his return on investment with Trout, but other baseball player deals suggest the best player of this generation is probably underpaid.Let’s look at the stadium. After paying for the land, Moreno’s group will spend hundreds of millions more to fix or rebuild the baseball facility, no less construct the properties expected to fill the land – including parking structures. Those dollars are spent with significant development risk: Creating an entertainment hub isn’t simple or easily lucrative.Ponder the five-star Monarch Beach Resort’s history. Its builders spent $200 million opening it in 2001. But the Great Recession trashed the tourism business, forcing the owners to give the resort back to their bankers. Even Citibank, a key lender, turned down the opportunity to acquire the resort a decade ago when its value slipped below $100 million.Or think of baseball signings. Angels’ history includes paying big dollars for “star” players who produced disappointing results – such as Mo Vaughn and Josh Hamilton. Paying up doesn’t always work. Even the team’s 10-year, $240 million deal with Albert Pujols, with two seasons remaining, doesn’t pencil as a profitable transaction using pure baseball logic.Are you a real estate fan? Then sign up for The Home Stretch newsletter and its Bubble Watch edition. A twice-a-week review of what’s important for housing around the region! Subscribe here!The bottom line is the city limited its land-sale options – and thus the final price – because its leaders want another entertainment hub on the site, and that’s a high-stakes endeavor. Yes, it could be a grand slam for the buyers. It could also be a disaster.But the real reason the seller of the Monarch Beach Resort and Mike Trout both got big dollars is they employed a tactic the city of Anaheim did not: real market pressure.Yes, the resort was quietly shopped without much fanfare. And Trout’s latest contract was negotiated outside the glare of high-profile free agency. The prospects of other suitors, even theoretical, pushed those final prices higher, no doubt. The city talked only with Moreno.Anaheim‘s current political leadership led by Mayor Harry Sidhu was unwilling to do what was necessary to maximize the asset’s value: Wish the Angels good riddance and hold a public auction for the stadium area parcels.Heck, maybe playing hardball would have compelled Moreno to offer more. Even the city’s own appraiser said the sales price would have been higher – if there was no stadium required for the property.But at least there’s some good news for Anaheim taxpayers in this stadium deal. City coffers get some significant cash, and even more importantly, the city gets out of managing this entertainment property. Let’s remember, the land development business offers zero guarantees. Even when you’re talking about prime, freeway-close real estate next to a major transit stop – just down Katella Avenue from Disneyland.Baseball stadiums and surrounding acreage don’t often sell. That means there’s no easy “comp” – real estate lingo for comparable properties. This balloons the valuation challenge, pushing price judgment to all sorts of strange economic calculations – as the city appraiser did in their report on the stadium’s value.last_img read more