Month: June 2021

  • LV= Cup Semi-Final and Final dates confirmed

    first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Northampton Saints – Last years LV=Cup winners The Rugby Football Union and Sky Sports have agreed fixture dates for the Semi-Finals and Final of the LV= Cup, however venues are still to be confirmed. Last year’s final allowed winners Northampton (who beat Gloucester 30 – 24), to pick up their first silverware of the season.Set to take place in front of the live Sky Sports cameras, the semi final fixtures will take place over the weekend of March 11-13, with the competition then concluding the following weekend. The semi finalists will be determined after Round 4 on the weekend of February 6.Semi final 1 – Friday, March 11, 2000Semi final 2 – Sunday, March 13, 1300Final – Sunday, March 20, 1530London Wasps and Harlequins have announced earlier in the week that their Round 3 match is to be played in Abu Dhabi.Semi-finals and final qualification: then ii if the scores are tied after extra-time, then the team that has scored the most tries in the match (including extra time) shall be deemed the winner;then iii if the teams have scored the same number of tries in the match (including extra-time), then the winner will be determined by a place-kick competition.center_img A Each of the four qualifying clubs shall be ranked as below and shall play each other as follows:Semi-final 1 – 1st ranked club v 4th ranked club Semi-final 2 – 2nd ranked club v 3rd ranked clubB The first club listed in each of the semi-final matches shall be the home clubC In the event of a tie at full-time at either semi-final or the final the winner of that shall be determined by:i. extra-time of 20 minutes (10 minutes each way);last_img read more

  • The Rugby Week in Review: June 6-12

    first_img Catch up in the Rugby week that was: June 6-12…Soon be retired Al Baxter getting some quality time with Highlander Jimmy CowanIt was announced earlier in the week that the new sponsors of the Magners League is to become the RaboDirect Pro12. The name just rolls off the tongue.With the awards season in full swing, it was about time we released our winners…Player Of The Year: Chris AshtonTeam Of The Year: Cobham U18Coach Of The Year: Rob BaxterYoung Player Of The Year: Sam WarburtonOutstanding Achievement Of The Year: Canterbury CrusadersNon Evans MBEWith the Queen’s birthday, comes the honour list, and none other than all-round sportswoman Non Evans has been awarded an MBE for her services to sport. Non Evans MBE definitely has a ring to it.Thursday proved to be fruitful in milestones as Andy Blyth reached the summit of Mt Kilimanjaro, along with David Barnes, Mark Regan and the rest of their team. Suffering a life-changing injury 11 years ago and fearing he will never walk again, he conquered the highest peak in Africa and become an even bigger inspiration to us all.After the success of the inaugural Help for Heroes charity match back in 2008 at Twickenham, Simon Halliday and co have decided to stage another rugby spectacular! The December 3rd fixture will see a battle of the hemispheres – North v South. If you’ve ever wondered which side would rein supreme then this is the game for you. If not it’ll just be a nice day out. Week in Review: May 30 – June 5 |    May 23-29 |   May 16-22 |    May 9-15 |     May 2 – 8 SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 11: Al Baxter of the Waratahs and Jimmy Cowen of the Highlanders exchange words on the ground during the round 17 Super Rugby match between the Waratahs and the Highlanders at the Sydney Football Stadium on June 11, 2011 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England Saxons have taken control of the Churchill cup and have secured themselves a final clash against Canada, a repeat of last year.Talking of the Southern Hemisphere…James O’Connor’s Super Rugby season has come to an abrupt end after he has been suspended for a week – citing a dangerous tackle on Reds’ captain James Horwill. On a different note, the word around town is that Rabs will be staying with The Force, even though The Reds, Rebels and Brumbies were interested in his services.The Waratah’s sent a message out declaring they are still hungry for a Super Rugby play-off place. They beat the Highlanders 33-7 (where this week’s picture has been taken from.) Kurtley Beale showed the world why he’s the Million Dollar Baby, as he was practically responsible for the ‘Tah’s glorious win. Check out the amazing highlights…last_img read more

  • A Q&A with Bath prop Henry Thomas

    first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Kinetica Sports is the official sports nutrition partner to Bath Rugby. For a chance to win a tickets to Bath v Saracens thanks to Kinetica, click here.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Henry Thomas talks Bath, rugby heroes and accounting Advertising FeatureHow does Bath compare to Sale?Farleigh House is a unique place, and a great location to come and train every day. The organisation as a whole is impressive, but there’s a real focus on developing each individual player which is a real draw for any professional athlete in a team sport. That said, Bath and Sale might be miles apart geographically, but both teams have a positive approach to the game and play some exciting rugby.Have you always been a prop or did you start out in a different position?I think I was always destined to be a prop. I tried my hand at No 8 in my early teens and even had a go at centre in sevens, but I’ve pretty much always been a prop.Which players have you tried to model yourself on?The big one for me is probably Carl Hayman, especially when I was a teenager. He was playing for the All Blacks and then moved to Newcastle. He was quite tall for a tighthead, but one of the best scrummagers in the game and he could run around the field a bit as well.Prop idol: All Black Carl Hayman in action for Newcastle. Photo: Getty ImagesProps seem to be coming through to the top level at a younger age now – what do you make of the development of front-rowers and how much difference does game time at a young age make?Game time makes a huge difference. I wouldn’t be where I am today without getting a bit of a lucky break at Sale with a few guys unfortunately having to retire. You learn from all your experiences on the pitch and there is absolutely no substitute for game time in the front row, no matter what level it is. That’s probably why there are a few more coming through at a younger age nowadays: there’s more opportunities for valuable game time with the Aviva A League and options for loans or dual-registration.Front-rowers rarely play a full 80 minutes these days. How does this affect your performance and recovery?center_img It’s such an attritional position that playing 80 minutes is tough – in fact, playing any minutes in the front row is tough. Usual time of play is 50-60 minutes but it still feels like you’ve played 80 when you come off. It takes a few days to recover from the collisions and impact on the body and that 10-15 minutes does make a difference. We’re lucky at this level in that we have the best medical and nutritional advice which helps us with preparation and recovery.What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?At a young age it’s important you don’t neglect your skills. Players in all positions should develop their core skills in order to be able to perform at any level.Hard line: Henry Thomas on the charge in Bath colours. Photo: Getty ImagesWho’s been your toughest opponent?I’ve had a few tough ones over the years. When I was slightly younger I had some tough battles with Nick Wood at Gloucester. Over the last couple of seasons it’s been Marcos Ayerza, who’s one of the best looseheads in the game scrummaging-wise, so it’s always a hard battle against him.What do you get up to away from rugby – hobbies, studies etc?I spend a lot of time with the guys. We have a bit of a coffee club going in town. We play a lot of golf together, and one of my best mates is a golfer so I try and get out on the course whenever I can. I’m studying accounting as well, which is keeping me busy in my spare time. Pass master: Henry Thomas shows his skill-set for Bath. Photo: Getty Images last_img read more

  • Six Nations Round Two Talking Points

    first_imgFrom Wales v England hype to positional play to the Women’s Six Nations frontrunners, we reflect on round two of the championship TRY TIME Jess Breach races down the wing for England’s first try of the @Womens6Nations Watch LIVE on @SkySports [Mix or Arena] #SendHerVictorious pic.twitter.com/WgpNDVedN7— England Rugby (@EnglandRugby) February 1, 2019 If Sexton played deeper, defenders wouldn’t be able to reach him so easily but he also wouldn’t be such a threat.Don’t expect Sexton to change. And don’t expect teams to stop targeting him – and other tens.And a couple of funnies to finish…First, Romain Poite needs to work on his hand signals. A couple of times at BT Murrayfield he was trying to signal to stadium staff that a ball was required, but the way he was moving his hands looked more like he was bringing in the Television Match Official!Mixed signals: Are referee Romain Poite and Ireland’s Conor Murray asking for a ball or the TMO? (Getty Images)Secondly, when the teams came out onto the pitch at Twickenham, France centre Mathieu Bastareaud launched into a forward roll. Plenty to say: Warren Gatland and Eddie Jones look at the Guinness Six Nations launch (Getty Images) Eddie Jones hails “greatest Welsh side ever”The hype for Wales v England has begun. This fixture is always a big match and it has become even bigger given that they are the only two teams unbeaten after two rounds of the Six Nations.The match in Cardiff on 23 February is now being billed as a title decider – and Eddie Jones has already heaped praise on his opponents.After England secured their biggest win over France for more than a century, Jones described Gatland’s team as “the greatest Welsh side ever”.Most who watched Wales’ win over Italy would likely find fault with that statement, but it was their 11th consecutive Test victory, equalling the country’s best-ever run.Gatland was hoping the unimpressive nature of that win, with a much-changed side, would lower expectations ahead of the England match, saying: “A lot of people will write us off, which is a good position to be in. Hopefully we’ll go under the radar.”Jones clearly hasn’t bought into that, however, and decided to put the focus back on Wales by hailing them after his team’s win at Twickenham.“We’re playing against the greatest Welsh side ever,” he said. “We’re playing against a Warren Gatland side, he’s been top of the tree in European rugby for the last few years.“They’re a tough, physical team, they contest hard at the breakdown, you have to earn every point against them. I’m looking forward to getting down there.”Many will also be looking forward to the comments Jones and Gatland send in each other’s direction over the next two weeks. The build-up has begun.Playing players out of position causes problems France started the match at Twickenham with a wing at full-back – Yoann Huget – and two centres on the wing – Gael Fickou and Damian Penaud. So was it any wonder England targeted that back three with their kicking game?Jonny May scored three tries in the corner – two from kicks and one from a long Owen Farrell pass. For the first try he outpaced the French defenders, for the second he stepped around Penaud and for the third – after France had failed to deal with a high ball – he was again quicker than the French chasers to touch down a kick.Related: Watch – Jonny May scores 30-minute hat-trick against FranceThat’s not to say May wouldn’t have scored a hat-trick if France had played an out-and-out winger on the wing, but he may not have found it so easy. Penaud didn’t have the pace to match May and the back three as a whole looked unsteady in terms of their positional understanding.Wide man: Jonny May beats Damian Penaud to score his second try (Getty Images)It’s little wonder Thomas Ramos replaced Huget at half-time. He was making his debut but looked more composed at 15 than his experienced team-mate.France also looked more dangerous with Antoine Dupont and Romain Ntamack at half-back in the latter stages of the match – will Jacques Brunel give them a go from the off against Scotland?England in pole position in Women’s Six Nations The Red Roses clash against France in Doncaster in the Women’s Six Nations was supposed to be a tight contest, a title decider in fact, between the sides ranked two and three in the world. Instead, England ran out comfortable 41-26 winners.Two converted tries in the last five minutes gave the scoreline more respectability from France’s point of view – and meant the visitors also left with a try bonus point – but in truth England had wrapped up the win well before then.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It was 24-0 at half-time and they added another three tries after the break, England clinical in possession whereas France made too many mistakes.The fact England conceded nearly four times as many penalties as France – 19 to five – shows how the visitors had opportunities to score more points, but their own handling errors let them down.Related: Women’s Six Nations fixturesThe French were also hindered by their selection policy. With the Sydney leg of the Women’s World Sevens Series taking place last weekend, the nation’s sevens players were unavailable for the first two rounds of the Six Nations.This has long been an issue in the women’s game and there needs to be more thought given to the calendar so there are not overlapping tournaments and key players missing from either sevens or 15s.Frontrunners: England celebrate as Poppy Cleall scores against France (Getty Images)England’s victory, which featured braces for Jess Breach and Poppy Cleall, puts them in pole position to lift the Six Nations trophy, as they will be expected to win the remaining matches against Wales, Italy and Scotland.Tens will always be targetedJust after Johnny Sexton had released the ball to Jacob Stockdale, launching the Ireland winger through a gap to run in a try from 45 metres against Scotland, he was hit hard by Allan Dell.The Scotland prop was warned by Romain Poite to watch his timing, the hit being a little late, but there was no penalty.Big hit: Johnny Sexton is tackled by Allan Dell of Scotland as he passes to Jacob Stockdale (Getty Images)Sexton received treatment after that incident – Conor Murray took the conversion – and seven minutes later, having been hit hard again, this time by Ryan Wilson, he was taken off. He failed an HIA and didn’t return.From the stands, it appeared targeting Sexton was part of Scotland’s game plan and while there was some debate online about the number and power of the tackles coming his way, it shouldn’t be a surprise.Teams always target tens, trying to unsettle the opposition by unsettling the playmaker. It may look like Sexton is targeted more than others but this is most likely because he plays so flat to the line. One of his strengths is taking the ball into the face of the defence and then producing the key pass. Unfortunately we have been unable to source any video evidence of this so you will just have to trust us; it was certainly an unusual sight. It was also probably the most metres Bastareaud made all game – maybe because Courtney Lawes wasn’t in front of him to drive him backwards in the tackle!Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

  • USA Eagles backed to win Olympic gold after Las Vegas success

    first_img Izzy Cerullo on internet fame after her engagement at the Olympic Games Izzy Cerullo on internet fame after her engagement… US sevens hero Zack Test believes the Eagles are in with a shout of gold in Tokyo in 2020. By Oliver Pickup Heroes of Hong Kong: A study of Fiji sevens Ruby Tui: Sevens Transformed My Life Collapse “It’s something that all athletes in America can find a skill-set in, because rugby is the ultimate sport, in my opinion. You’ve got to have all the skills and assets to be successful in the field, and the constant action, and big hits, and quick turnover between games really captivates the American audience.“It is now something that they really want to get behind especially because the team has a great chance to become gold medallists in Tokyo next year.” Ruby Tui: Sevens Transformed My Life Izzy Cerullo on internet fame after her engagement at the Olympic Games Expand What a rush: USA celebrate beating Samoa 27-0 in the Vegas final (Getty Images) Heroes of Hong Kong: A study of Fiji sevens Test was the highest try scorer in American history, with 143, until early 2018 when Baker surpassed that figure. As things stand, Baker is currently joint-seventh in the all-time try-scorers list, with 179, while Isles is equal eleventh with 159.However, Friday’s side did not need the firepower of Isles in the one-sided match versus Samoa – though his earlier hat-trick in the 24-19 win against New Zealand had guaranteed the host’s final berth. Player of the final Ben Pinkleman scored a brace of tries, while Hughes, Matai Leuta and Maceo Terrel Brown all dotted down.Success breeds success, and with the support of top-tier Sevens Series sponsor HSBC, the game is certainly growing across the United States. “Sevens has really taken off in America, due to the passionate American fans loving the high, energetic, constant-action game,” adds Test. 30 Minutes with… Carlin Isles LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Expand The USA Sevens star – the fastest man… 30 Minutes with… Carlin Isles After a troubled childhood, Ruby Tui has become… USA Eagles backed to win Olympic gold after Las Vegas successAmerican sevens hero Zack Test is convinced the Eagles will fly high and swoop Olympic gold next year. It’s a bold prediction, but given the team’s incredible form in the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series – Mike Friday’s team tops the table at the half-way stage, having defended its Las Vegas crown on Sunday – it would be foolish to dismiss it as simply patriotic baloney.When asked whether his country can win in Tokyo next summer, Test, who amassed 601 points in 52 Sevens Series tournaments between 2009 and 2016, is unequivocal in his response. “That 100%, yes,” the 29-year-old says. “This team has been together for five years now. Most Olympic or World Cup winning sides have three or four years together. Next year they will be at the peak of their powers. They are showing amazing consistency in the Sevens Series, and that will build their belief.”Indeed, in the four rounds before Las Vegas the Americans had finished as runners-up. The success on home soil, which was confirmed with a dominant 27-0 victory over Samoa in the final at the Sam Boyd Stadium, underlined their continued improvement and elevated them above New Zealand at the top of the table. Hitherto the country’s best ever overall Sevens Series finish has been fifth, achieved two seasons ago. This year – with the top four granted automatic qualification for the Olympics – the players look certain to better that, in some style.Test, who announced his retirement from rugby in early 2018 after suffering a life-threatening head injury a year earlier, in a 15-a-side match against Uruguay, reckons having two of the quickest players in world rugby – Carlin Isles and Perry Baker – means that tries are not hard to come by.Former star: Zack Test in action for the United States in 2016 (Getty Images)“Carlin and Perry are very special athletes because they’ve got an asset that less than 1 per cent of the world’s population has,” he continues. “Having that asset on your team – twice – is reassuring because you know that at any given moment they could really turn open the game with their speed and athletic ability. Also, they’re a wonderful bridge for American athletes: Carlin who was a track athlete, and Perry who was an American Football player and both have made the transition over to rugby and have enjoyed great success on the world stage.”Isles has clocked 10.13 seconds in the 100 metres, and Baker – who missed the Las Vegas Sevens due to suffering a broken jaw – is not far behind. Yet there is more to their games that raw speed, and great credit must go to Friday for their development. The latter has been named the World Rugby Sevens Player of the year in 2017 and 2018, while the former is the currently leading the try-scoring chart with 26, four more than second-placed Alasio Sovita Naduva from Fiji. Meanwhile, talismanic skipper Madison Hughes leads the overall points table, with 166. Expand On this golden form, who would bet against this maturing and confident American team to top the podium?Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. By Oliver Pickup Fiji men’s sensational success at…last_img read more

  • Rugby’s Greatest: David Kirk

    first_img Winners of the past two World Cups, the… TAGS: The Greatest Players David Kirk holds aloft the Webb Ellis Cup Rugby’s Greatest: Kieran Read LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Major teams: AucklandCountry: New ZealandTest span: 1985-87Test caps: 17 (17 starts)Test points: 24 (6T) New Zealand’s Kieran Read is fast becoming the… All Black Richie McCaw is the greatest openside… Rugby’s Greatest: Richie McCaw By now firmly established for Auckland under coach John Hart, he wasn’t expected to lead the All Blacks into the World Cup until fate dealt regular captain Andy Dalton a poor hand after he had had to withdraw due to injury, to be replaced by a young Sean Fitzpatrick. Rugby’s Greatest: David KirkThe No 9 from Wellington led a stellar team featuring John Kirwan, Michael Jones and Grant Fox to a 29-9 win over France in the final, after cantering through the group and knockout stages without so much as a bloody nose.After taking a medical degree at Otago University, sport took precedence for Kirk as he shone first in sevens, in which he had enough pace to play on the wing, and then 15s, in which his talent was first given a wider audience playing for New Zealand Colts while in his early twenties.His snappy service, livewire presence around the breakdown and sharp rugby brain saw him pegged as a future All Black and he made his full debut against England in 1985.A future Oxford scholar, he took a principled stance after refusing to tour with the breakaway Cavaliers in 1986. His abstinence was on moral grounds as he felt the tour to South Africa was complicit in supporting apartheid.center_img Rugby’s Greatest: Kieran Read Rugby’s Greatest: Richie McCaw New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Collapse Expand Kirk scored five tries as the hosts romped to the first world crown, including one in the final against France. “He was the shining light of New Zealand rugby,” Fitzpatrick said, “an outstanding scrum-half and an outstanding captain.”Kirk retired from competitive rugby the following year after just 17 caps to take up a Rhodes Scholarship at Oxford University. He was just 26.It was the springboard to a hugely successful business career that has seen him act as chief adviser to New Zealand prime minister Jim Bolger, a published author and CEO of Fairfax Media. He has also worked as a leading arbitrator in sporting disputes. Already an MBE, he was inducted into rugby’s Hall of Fame in 2011 and now resides in Sydney where he looks after his business portfolio. Expand Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

  • Six Nations Analysis: The top performers in 2020

    first_imgThe championship may be over for now but Sam Larner has been in his stats bunker working out which players have stood out No stopping him! @WelshRugbyUnion debutant Nick Tompkins goes straight through the heart of Italy’s defence for a top-class try#WALvITA #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/OJCqnMnO3f— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 1, 2020Stuart Hogg was the flashy star. He didn’t have too many opportunities, but he made the most of what he did have. That is really the job of a full-back: do the best with the limited opportunities that come your way. The same is true of wingers.With a lighter workload than some of his Scotland colleagues, Hogg was leaned on to create the tries. Something he did with aplomb against Italy in the first clip below… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Round Three had some special tries. We can’t wait for more in Round Four. #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/MSI6SjKkQW— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 3, 2020Arguably the most impressive performance was by Frenchman Gregory Alldritt. He was one of the reasons why France were able to do so well in the truncated tournament. He carried the most of anyone in the tournament and still finished above average for the results of those carries, including the try below. The Unseen WorkIf you are new to rugby you may be confused by some of the Man of the Match decisions, which are awarded to people who didn’t score tries or kick points. These awards are usually given for the ‘unseen work’; the jobs that need doing but won’t make highlight tapes.The best example of this is breakdown work. A successful carry isn’t just dependent on the ball-carrier. The ball-carrier may gain ten metres but if they immediately lose the ball because there are no support players that would not be a success.We rarely think about the job those support players do but there are stats collected for just that purpose.The data in this graph is taken per attacking minute and defensive minute spent on the pitch. So a player on a team who defended a lot wouldn’t see that penalised in their attacking rucks score.What is impressive is the work-rate of Maro Itoje and George Kruis. Both players hit almost two rucks every attacking minute. That is in addition to the carrying, dummy running and passing they must also do. This is hugely beneficial to the team because it frees the other forwards to go and make more effective carries without having the fatigue associated with hitting so many rucks.On the ball: George Kruis and Maro Itoje in England training (Getty Images)A good way of looking at this is to think of your own job. You almost certainly have a hefty workload but imagine if a temp came in and took 25% of your work off you, how much more effective would you be?Itoje and Kruis are the temps for England, creating opportunities for the likes of Tom Curry, Sam Underhill and Courtney Lawes to be more effective.You may also have looked at the graph and questioned why so many French players are near the top of the graph. We can look at that in more detail by breaking out the different teams and putting them into their own graphs.The French really stand out now. They were hitting far more defensive rucks than any of the other teams. This looks like a deliberate tactic brought in by Shaun Edwards. He wanted France to slow down opposition ball by hitting the rucks and trying to turn the ball over.You can see a similar tactic for both Scotland and Wales, who had the majority of their players hitting more defensive rucks than average but neither came close to France.This is something we can expect to see France continuing to do given the level of success they had in the tournament so far. The downside is that this requires extreme levels of fitness. France fell away in their first match against England as time passed and let in 14 of 23 points in the second half against Wales.When Edwards has had a full year with the French squad, you can expect those weaknesses to disappear.French tactic: Antoine Dupont kicks clear from a ruck (Getty Images)ConclusionThese other stats give us an idea of what else is going on in the game of rugby besides tries and points. Even if you pay close attention to a match it is easy to miss some of the work done by the players.When you next get an opportunity to watch a match – and I hope that isn’t many months off – try to look out for how players influence the game even without the ball. That may be through their support play at the breakdown or the carries which are made after their initial carry made ground.If you can identify these situations you will be able to understand everything that goes on in a match, not just the highlights. The April issue of Rugby World magazine – focusing on a new generation of Six Nations stars – is out now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Six Nations Analysis: The top performers in 2020Writing an article on the final round of the Six Nations has been complicated by the lack of a final round of the Six Nations. If all goes to plan we will be finishing off the tournament closer to Halloween than Easter.Luckily, as other people have been hoarding toilet paper I have been hoarding rugby statistics. Enough to pull together the best nuggets from the three, or four, depending on which team you support, rounds so far…The Best CarriersWe remember the game-breaking carries but just as important are the frequent carriers. Typically these are the forwards who must fight through the tightly packed defenders to create the space for the backs to make their memorable runs on the outside.The first thing to look at in this graph is the top right section. That indicates players who have made more carries than average and done more with each carry than the average.Wales centre Nick Tompkins stands out here. Not only did he make lots of carries, he didn’t let the quality drop with each one. He was able to make the highlight-reel carries, like the one below, but he was also able to take the strain off the forwards with regular carries. Star man: Gregory Alldritt making one of his many carries for France (Getty Images) Antoine Dupont with the vision Gregory Alldritt with the finish What a try from @FranceRugby! #FRAvITA #GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/AvL6vNjJWA— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 9, 2020Something to bear in mind if you are new to the game is the importance of the carry success. If you can carry the ball forward you create opportunities for the rest of your team to attack a retreating defence. That creates a favourable attacking environment. If you cannot carry forwards, the defence has the upper hand because they are able to keep pushing you back.Alldritt and players like Justin Tipuric and Jake Polledri were able to go forwards and create space for everyone else to operate in. For attack coaches that is crucial for their game plans, but the players doing that work can often be forgotten in favour of team-mates who are scoring the tries and making significant line breaks.last_img read more

  • Rugby Rant: Community pitches must improve

    first_imgIt’s time for upgrades, says Grounds Management Association CEO Geoff Webb Groundwork: Old Plymouthian and Mannameadians in training (Getty Images) There is a lot more to grounds management than mowing the grass, so training is vital. Luckily, it’s also readily available; we’ve been working with national governing bodies to support their strategies and provide online training courses for volunteers at  all levels during lockdown – see  thegma.org.uk/learning for details.Covid highlighted just how important sport is to us. Whether it’s at the top of the game or at a local level, sport is essential, but right now, the community pitches that ensure so many get to enjoy it need all the support they can get.Change is possible, and with a bit of work we know that almost 1.4m more children could play rugby or other sports on a grass pitch every week.Getting involved today can make a huge difference in the long term, so  why not become part of a team that makes sport possible? Rugby Rant: Community pitches must improveThis has been the year that rugby came grinding to a halt, both at a professional and community level, with many at a loss of what to do without being able to watch or play.We’re thrilled to have it back and many of us are looking forward to next season, but the pandemic isn’t the only threat to grass-roots rugby. Before Covid-19, the Grounds Management Association (GMA) undertook research that found that the nation’s community pitches are in dire need of attention. Our pitches have been in a state of decline for years due to long-term overplaying, coupled with an increasing demand for pitches.Currently, 47% of rugby league pitches and 26% of rugby union pitches can only accommodate one match a week. With Covid causing many pitches tobe neglected for months, these figures are likely to get worse, especially with the unpredictable wet weather we’re seeing.The negative implications of the state of our pitches goes deeper and affects certain groups worse than others, such as women. In union, there has been an 18.5% increase in girls and women registered with clubs in England in the last eight years, but pitch accessibility has failed to keep pace with this.“Community pitches ensure so many enjoy sport, but they need all the support they can get”If we act now, we can reverse this trend. Even just a few hours a month spent on local pitches could make a big difference, which is why the GMA is calling on rugby fans to get involved and start volunteering. It’s also important that the younger generation gets involved in caring for our pitches – we know that currently, more than two thirds of community grounds volunteers are over 60 and almost all are over 50.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the October 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

  • Video: Ashes to go

    first_img Rector Martinsville, VA February 28, 2014 at 9:07 pm I’ve been ambivalent about Ashes to Go for a while. On one hand, my own ministry is very much motivated by looking for ways to “take it to the streets”. On the other hand, something just feels a bit off about Ashes to Go.My friend, the Rev. Michael Sniffen (of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, NY) articulates a lot of what’s been lurking under my discomfort in his recent parish blog post (linked below), and he does it from the perspective of a priest who REALLY takes his ministry to the streets everyday throughout the year.You may have read about Michael here on ENS (as well as many secular news outlets). He’s been taking his ministry to the streets by serving as a Chaplain to the Occupy Wall Street movement, allowing his parish to serve as a primary hub for Occupy Sandy hurricane relief efforts, hosting artists and arts events, and countless other smaller ways. Some were so threatened by his “taking it to the streets” that his church was actually the victim of an arson attack just over a year ago.Public ministry is vitally important, and also sometimes risky. But it’s not enough to simply nod in that direction once a year.I comment his blog post to your discernment: http://stlukeandstmatthew.org/ashes-to-go-or-not-to-go-that-seems-to-be-the-question Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME February 23, 2013 at 2:48 pm This year, in the two weeks or so before Ash Wednesday, and anticipating a repeat of last year’s “Ashes To Go” outreach that was reported in 2012, I conducted a very UN-scientific survey. I was on the fence about joining the “ATG” movement. When the opportunity presented itself, I asked a variety of folks that I know about “Ashes to Go”. There were people with various levels of connectedness to any church or not. Typically, I’d pose a question such as: “What would you think about passing a priest standing on the sidewalk in town next to a sign declaring “Ashes to Go” on Ash Wednesday? The responses were cause for concern, amusement and skepticism about the idea. These are some of the actual reactions: “What is Lent, anyway?”; “That’s weird.”; “Really, you mean right on the town green?”; “No kidding, I didn’t know they still did Lent.”; “That’s new, isn’t it? Does that count for not going to church?”; “Who’s ashes do they use?”; “Well, I suppose if you can’t lead a horse to water, bring the water to them!”; “Well, if people are too lazy to go to church to get ashes why enable them?” “That’s a great idea, I always forget its Ash Wednesday until its too late.” — My best Ash Wednesday story happened when I was in seminary. While studying at General Theological Seminary, N.Y. I had the chance to assist with the Imposition of Ashes at Trinity Church, Wall Street where literally hundreds of people received ashes all day long. A woman approached my station, a long line behind her, and leaned forward to whisper something. “I’m not a Roman Catholic!” she whispered apologetically. I leaned back, looked her in the eye and responded, “That’s O.K., neither am I” and proceeded to sign her forehead with an ashen cross. “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Comments (4) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET February 28, 2014 at 11:26 pm I also commend Michale Sniffen’s excellent reflection. Here’s yet another perspective on this recent phenomenon http://reluctantxtian.wordpress.com/2014/02/21/ash-kicking-or-why-i-dont-think-ash-wednesday-is-a-good-day-for-peddling-religious-goods/ in which the author wonders if this is just a gimmick, offering “cheap grace” and “mortality on the fly”. In the absence of any solid pastoral theology as its foundation, I share the same concern.I think the priest in the video inadvertently names the animating dynamic of “Ashes to Go”. Oh, to be sure, there are good intentions, but there is also unmistakable anxiety. At the end of the clip, the priest says she offers “Ashes to Go”, “….in the hope that, next year, they’ll find their way back to church.” The purpose I fear, is not to ‘bring the church to the world’ or ‘make the church more relevant in people’s lives’ or to have “opportunities for grace”.That may be what we tell ourselves, but that’s not the real reason. It’s our own anxiety about row after row of empty pews. It’s in the hope that, if the church goes out to people, people will come into church. That’s just not going to happen, not unless the church goes out to people offering more than just a smudge of ashes on their forehead and more than just one day a year.I think the ancient Rabbi, Gamaliel, offers us some wisdom in this. We shall see if this is simply a fad or if it will last. My hunch? By the end of this decade, we’ll not be seeing much evidence of Ashes to Go. I suspect it is because it will not prosper the secret desire of helping people ‘find their way back to church.’ And, because good intentions, by themselves, have always paved the road that leads to a predictable destination. Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Rev. Jon M. Richardson says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Rev’d Anthony C. Dinoto says: Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 13, 2013 Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Church members, both clergy and lay, took to the streets on Ash Wednesday to offer the world the traditional symbol of the beginning of Lent. In this video produced on Ash Wednesday 2012, the Rev. Sandye A. Wilson offers imposition of ashes during a chilly morning at the New Jersey Transit train station in South Orange. During a break, she discusses the importance of bring the church to the streets. The Ashes to Go movement has grown annually. More information is available on the Ashes to Go website and here. Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Lent, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR February 13, 2013 at 3:27 pm I should totally use this as a way of teaching my train-obsessed five-year-old about Ash Wednesday. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Video: Ashes to go An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Grace Burson says: Video Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

  • Video – Transformed by service in Haiti: Young Adult Service…

    first_img Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Young Adult Service Corps, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Matthew DaviesPosted Dec 9, 2015 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Video, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Episcopal News Service] Ashley Bingaman, a music teacher from Virginia, served as a missionary in Haiti from 2012-2014 with the Episcopal Church’s Young Adult Service Corps program.“We’re not called to go be the savior. We’re not called to go be the hero,” she says. “We are called to share Christ’s love and we are called to be in relationship.”Young adults (21-30 years old) have an opportunity to transform their own lives while engaging mission and ministry in the Anglican Communion by joining the Young Adult Service Corps, commonly known as YASC.Applications are now available for 2016-2017 placements in the Young Adult Service Corps.The application, with additional information and instructions, is available here.The application deadline is Friday, Jan. 8, 2016. Missionaries, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth & Young Adults Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Video – Transformed by service in Haiti: Young Adult Service Corps Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Haiti, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more