Recent Posts

  • Green License Plate Idea Could Boost EV Sales In UK

    Plug-In Electric Car Sales Exceed 6,000 In June In UK Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Plates would help authorities enforce incentives such as bus lane access and EV parking.Electric cars could soon be fitted with green number plates to raise awareness of low-emission vehicles, the government has announced.More UK News The Department for Transport (DfT) has launched a public consultation into the plan, which would see the bright plates fitted to ultra-low emission vehicles including electric cars such as the Nissan Leaf and plug-in hybrid cars such as the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.Similar plates are already used by countries including Norway and Canada, where the DfT says they are “thought to encourage uptake” of low-emission vehicles.However, the DfT claims that the plates would do more than just promote technology should they arrive on our roads. The organization also says the plates could be used to help local authorities with incentives for electric vehicles, such as access to bus lanes, electric charging bays and ultra-low-emission zones.The plans are part of a government consultation that will seek public views on whether the plates will work in the UK and what they should look like.Potential designs include an all-green background on the front, rear or both ends of the vehicle, or a green symbol on the existing black-on-white and black-on-yellow plates.The Transport Secretary, Chris Grayling, said the green plates would be a “badge of honor” for environmentally friendly vehicles.“The UK has a proud history of leading the world in technological advances and that is no different for ultra-low emission vehicles, where we are at the forefront of innovation and testing.“This new cleaner, greener transport has the potential to bring with it cleaner air, a better environment and stronger economies for countries around the world.“Adding a green badge of honor to these new clean vehicles is a brilliant way of helping increase awareness of their growing popularity in the UK, and might just encourage people to think about how one could fit into their own travel routine.”Elisabeth Costa, Director at The Behavioural Insights Team, which works with the Cabinet Office to apply behavioral science to government policy, said: “We support efforts to increase awareness of the numbers of clean vehicles on our roads. Simple changes based on behavioral science can have a big impact.“Green plates would be more noticeable to road users, and this increased attraction can help normalize the idea of clean vehicles, highlighting the changing social norms around vehicle ownership.”The news comes ahead of the world’s first Zero-Emission Vehicle Summit, which will be hosted by the UK government between September 11 and 12.The summit in Buckinghamshire is designed to bring together nations from around the world, in a bid to support the development and uptake of green vehicles. The government wants the countries of the world to pledge collective action towards zero-emission journeys, while also showcasing the UK as one of the world leaders in zero-emission innovation. Electric Car Sales Drop In UK As False Consumer Concerns Remain 42% Of Brits Are Confused – Think Electric Cars Can’t Go In A Car Wash read more

  • Tesla to improve its new dashcam feature with more Autopilot cameras and

    Source: Charge Forward With the launch of the version 9 software update, Tesla is introducing its new dashcam feature, but as we reported, it has quite a few limitations compared to an average aftermarket dashcam.Now Elon Musk says that Tesla will improve on it with more Autopilot cameras and parking mode. more…The post Tesla to improve its new dashcam feature with more Autopilot cameras and parking mode appeared first on Electrek.

  • Proterra partners with Thomas to build electric school buses

    first_imgSource: InsideEVs Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine Daimler, the parent company of Thomas Built Buses, recently made a major investment in electric bus maker Proterra. Now the two companies have unveiled an electric school bus featuring Proterra’s powertrain.Thomas originally presented the Saf-T-Liner eC2, aka Jouley, in late 2017. The latest version is being co-developed at Proterra’s Greenville, South Carolina manufacturing facility. Few technical details have been released, but Daimler says Jouley can be recharged using the CCS standard at 60 kW in three hours, which suggests a battery capacity of about 180 kWh.“School buses provide critical community infrastructure and are an excellent application for vehicle electrification,” said Proterra CEO Ryan Popple. “We’re pleased to work with an industry leader like Thomas Built Buses to unveil a high-performance electric school bus that reduces our children’s exposure to diesel emissions.”last_img read more

  • Jaguar IPace Wins European Car Of The Year

    first_img“For our first electric vehicle to also be the first Jaguar to win European Car of the Year gives us a huge sense of pride,” Jaguar CEO Ralf Speth said about the honor.Being European Car of the Year might not be the I-Pace’s last trophy for the year because it’s also among the finalists to be World Car of the Year. The electric crossover was also up for the North American Utility of the Year honor, but the Jag lost to the Hyundai Kona and Kona EV. However, the EV scored 55 awards from around the world since its launch, including taking UK Car Of The Year. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 4, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Jaguar I-PACE Is Awarded UK Car Of The Year 2019 EV Range Test: Tesla Model X Vs. Audi e-tron & Jaguar I-Pace: Video Double winner. I-Pace scores two awards in one day.The Jaguar I-Pace has won the 2019 European Car of the Year award at the Geneva Motor Show, marking the British automaker’s first trophy for the honor. The brand’s electric crossover actually tied with the Alpine A110 with each of them receiving 250 points. The Jag earned the overall victory because more voters put it at the top of their list than the Alpine. The Kia Ceed and Ford Focus took third and fourth place with 247 and 235 points, respectively.center_img The I-Pace is Jaguar’s entry into the burgeoning premium electric crossover segment against vehicles like the Tesla Model X and forthcoming Audi E-Tron. Power comes from two electric motors – one on each axle – making a total of 394 horsepower (294 kilowatts) and 512 pound-feet (694 Newton-meters) of torque. The EV can hit 60 miles per hour (96 kilometers per hour) in 4.5 seconds, and the 90-kilowatt-hour battery provides an EPA-estimated 234-mile (377-kilometer) range. More I-Pace News Watch Jaguar I-Pace Electric SUV Take On Snow & Ice: Video Ian Callum director of design of Jaguar receives the #CaroftheYear 2019 award from Frank Janssen president of the Coty Jury pic.twitter.com/vSredyRi63— Car of the Year (@caroftheyear) March 4, 2019last_img read more

  • Tesla TSLA says it is open to seeking alternative financing sources

    first_imgSource: Charge Forward For the first time in a while, Tesla (TSLA) appears to be setting the table for raising capital as the company added a note in its quarterly SEC filing saying that they “may choose to seek alternative financing sources.” more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8COKnXNH-EThe post Tesla (TSLA) says it is open to seeking ‘alternative financing sources’ appeared first on Electrek.last_img

  • Tesla is considering giving away Full SelfDriving for free as part of

    first_imgElon Musk says that he is considering giving away Tesla’s Full Self-Driving upgrade package for free as part of the owner’s referral program. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Tesla is considering giving away Full Self-Driving for free as part of the referral program appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

  • Snoopy on course for the Hennessy

    first_imgHorse racing Horse racing Snoopy Loopy, who was expected to be a bit-part player in the National Hunt season until he beat a field that included Kauto Star at Haydock last weekend, will attempt a second big-race victory in the space of eight days after Peter Bowen, his trainer, yesterday declared him a definite runner in the Hennessy Cognac Gold Cup at Newbury on Saturday.Bowen suggested after Snoopy Loopy’s success in the Betfair Chase five days ago that the Hennessy might come too soon for the 10-year-old, who ran on strongly to beat Tamarinbleu after Kauto Star slipped on landing after the final fence. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter @Greg_Wood_ Wed 26 Nov 2008 19.01 EST The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share on Pinterest Snoopy on course for the Hennessy Share via Email However, he said yesterday that the gelding is now “a definite runner all being well”, and that “we will then supplement him for the King George at the Christmas Festival if all goes well.”The change of heart is in part due to an attempt to win the British Horseracing Authority Order of Merit, in which Snoopy Loopy is the early leader. “The Order of Merit has been the target since day one of the season for Snoopy Loopy and the £200,000 prize money that is put up is a big incentive for any trainer who has the right horse,” said Bowen.Snoopy Loopy will have the better part of a stone in hand of the field on Saturday according to the official handicapper, since he has been raised to a mark of 168 after his latest win but can effectively race off 158 at Newbury. However, he remains an outsider at around 16-1, and the Timeform organisation suggested yesterday that there was no clear reason to raise him at all for his Haydock victory. “We have Snoopy Loopy rated 157 after the Betfair Chase, which saw him run up to his previous best,” Kieran Packman, Timeform’s communications manager, said yesterday. “He again showed an excellent attitude and is still progressing, but, as far as we’re concerned, it’s hard to escape the conclusion that he benefited from the below-par showings of others. After all, he had been beaten by Ollie Magern and Exotic Dancer in receipt of weight in recent runs.” Big Buck’s remains the narrow favourite at 5-1 to give Paul Nicholls a third victory in the Hennessy in six years, though Island Flyer, from Tom George’s yard, continues to shorten in the betting and is now generally a 7-1 chance. Denis O’Regan has been booked to take over from Paddy Brennan, who must honour his retainer with Nigel Twiston-Davies and ride Knowhere. “He jumped round Wincanton fine and Tom’s horses are in great form,” said O’Regan.Paul Carberry, who was due to ride Sublimity, the 2007 champion hurdler, in the Fighting Fifth Hurdle at Newcastle on Saturday, faces a spell on the sidelines after suffering a suspected broken collarbone in a fall at Enghien in France yesterday. Dean Gallagher was also taken to hospital for X-rays after a fall at the same course. He was due to ride Grivette in a Group Three contest worth €58,500 later in the afternoon, but was replaced by James Reveley, who steered the filly to an easy success. This article is more than 10 years old Share on Facebook Read more Greg Woodcenter_img Share on LinkedIn First published on Wed 26 Nov 2008 19.01 EST Support The Guardian Share on Messenger Shares00 news … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Twitter Share via Email Since you’re here… This article is more than 10 years old Share on WhatsApp Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

  • US v Sigelman – Just The Latest DOJ FCPA Trial Debacle

    first_imgIn the words of the DOJ “our recent string of successful prosecutions of corporate executives [in FCPA cases] is worth highlighting.”In the minds of others, “FCPA prosecutorial overreach by the Department of Justice (DOJ) is a myth.”And now for some cold-hard facts.Since September 2011, the DOJ has been put to its burden of proof at trial four times in FCPA enforcement actions.  As highlighted in this post, each instance was a trial court debacle for the DOJ.The most recent debacle of course was U.S. v. Sigelman (the facts and circumstances of which most readers are presumed to know given recent events, but if not see here, here and here for prior posts.)Sigelman was no aberration and the remainder of this post highlights the other three most recent instances of the DOJ being put to its burden of proof in an FCPA trial.Africa Sting (2011-2012)In January 2010, the DOJ announced criminal charges against 22 executives and employees of companies in the military and law enforcement products industry for engaging in a scheme to pay bribes to the minister of defense of an African country.  However, there was no actual involvement from any minister of defense, rather it was a manufactured sting operation.  Given the number of defendants, four separate trials were scheduled.The first Africa Sting trial started in May 2011 and involved four defendants.  At the close of the DOJ’s case, Judge Richard Leon dismissed a substantive FCPA charge against one defendant (Pankesh Patel), dismissed another substantive FCPA charge against another defendant (Lee Tolleson) and dismissed the money laundering count against all defendants (Patel, Tolleson, Andrew Bigelow, and John Weir).  In July 2011, Judge Leon declared a mistrial as to all remaining counts against all defendants.The second Africa Sting trial began in September 2011.  At the close of the DOJ’s case, Judge Leon dismissed the conspiracy charge against all defendants (John Mushriqui, Jeana Mushriqui, Patrick Caldwell, Stephen Giordanella, John Godsey, and Mark Morales).  Because Giordanella faced only that conspiracy charge, he was exonerated.  The trial proceeded, the charges went to the jury, the jury deliberated, and in January 2012, the jury found two defendants (Caldwell and Godsey) not guilty.  The jury hung as to the remaining defendants, and once again Judge Leon declared a mistrial as to all remaining counts against the remaining defendants.Shortly after conclusion of the second trial, the jury foreman published this guest post on FCPA Professor and shortly thereafter the DOJ moved to dismiss with prejudice the criminal charges against all of the remaining defendants including those initially charged but not yet tried (Helmie Ashiblie, Yochanan Cohen, Amaro Goncalves, Saul Mishkin, David Painter, Lee Wares, Ofer Paz, Israel Weisler and Michael Sacks).  The next day, Judge Leon granted the motion to dismiss and stated (see here) “this appears to be the end of a long and sad chapter in the annals of white collar criminal enforcement.”Lindsey Manufacturing et al (2011)In 2010, the DOJ charged Lindsey Manufacturing Co. and two of its executives (company CEO Keith Lindsey and company CFO Steve Lee) with FCPA offenses for their alleged roles in a conspiracy to pay bribes to alleged Mexican “foreign officials.”  In May 2011, Lindsey Manufacturing, Lindsey, and Lee were found guilty of various FCPA charges after a five-week jury trial.  (See here).However, after months of post-trial legal wrangling, in December 2011 Judge Howard Matz (C.D. Cal.) vacated the convictions and dismissed the indictment after finding numerous instances of prosecutorial misconduct.  In the words of Judge Matz, the instances of misconduct were so varied and occurred over such a long time “that they add up to an unusual and extreme picture of a prosecution gone badly awry.”  (See here).John O’Shea (2012)In November 2009, John O’Shea was charged with FCPA and related offenses for allegedly making improper payments to alleged Mexican “foreign officials.”  O’Shea mounted a defense and proceeded to trial.  In January 2012, following the DOJ’s case, Judge Lynn Hughes (S.D. Tex.) dismissed the FCPA charges against O’Shea.  In doing so, Judge Hughes stated:  ”The problem here is that the principal witness against Mr. O’Shea … knows almost nothing.”  (See here).  During the trial, Judge Hughes also admonished other aspects of the DOJ’s case stating:   “I don’t know what was presented to the Grand Jury, but … the Government should have been prepared before they brought the charges to the Grand Jury. It’s something you have to prove. And you shouldn’t indict people on stuff you can’t prove.”  (See here).To read more about the Africa Sting, O’Shea and Lindsey Manufacturing cases see the article “What Percentage of DOJ FCPA Losses Is Acceptable?“There are numerous civil society organizations devoted to bribery and corruption topics that are vocal about current trends.Where is the civil society concern about the string of DOJ FCPA trial court debacles? After all, these debacles are effecting real people, with real families, with real reputations.Does anyone care?last_img read more

  • Tennis Legend Andy Roddick Sues Tennis Charity in Dallas

    first_img Username Password Remember me Lost your password?center_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Dykema Gossett litigation partner Brian Colao, who has represented several pro athletes, including Phil Mickelson, is representing Roddick in the lawsuit . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img

  • Harpist Plays Creativity into Law Career

    first_img Password Lost your password? Winston & Strawn partner Denmon Sigler is used to the question: How did a harpist become an oil and gas attorney . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Usernamecenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Remember melast_img

  • Akin Gump SCOOPS Up Oklahoma Oil Assets from VE Client for 185B

    first_img Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Password Lawyers for Akin Gump and Vinson & Elkins said Tuesday that they recently facilitated a deal between Oklahoma City-based Gulfport Energy Corp. and a Quantum Energy Partners portfolio company involving Oklahoma’s SCOOP region . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Lost your password? Remember melast_img

  • Yurts Alternative Living For All Ages

    first_imgby, Logan Jamieson, Guest-BloggerTweet7Share16Share5Email28 SharesAs I first opened my ears today, I heard the morning dove’s greeting.  My eyes followed, noticing the droplets of dew blanketing the clear dome skylight 18 ft. above my head.  Most mornings in the Yurt provide this serenity.Oops…let me back up.  A what?….. A Yurt!  Originally a nomadic Mongolian structure, a Yurt is a semi-portable round living structure framed in wood and covered in canvas.  It is my statement of autonomy and self-love.  Having grown up in the hotel industry I am deeply committed to providing healthy and healing space to others.I am 27, male, have a B.S. in Gerontology from Ithaca College (where I had the pleasure of briefly meeting Dr. Bill Thomas), a B.S. in Healthcare Management with a minor in Finance from Ithaca College, and a Masters in Health Administration from Suffolk University in Boston, MA.  Not counting the $225,000 already paid off to Ithaca College in full, I pay $953/month as a minimum loan payment for the graduate degree.  The first two years after obtaining my Masters I paid $420/month which only covered the interest and none of the principal.  Needless to say, my financial situation felt impossible.Opening up to new and alternative living arrangements was what allowed me to bring my finances into balance.  I built a 12 ft. Yurt and a 30 ft. Yurt, each for under $2,500 and found an elder couple who owned 30 acres and let me live on their land in a work-trade agreement.As we prepare for the largest segment of our labor force to enter into retirement, concerns regarding social security grow and a struggling economy is real for many of us regardless of age.  Although my experience does not directly translate to senior living communities it has raised some questions within me.Does anyone know of any senior living communities which incorporate circular buildings for housing?  They seem in many ways to be less expensive, use less materials, are more energy efficient, and provide greater structural integrity than conventional timber framing.  I have definitely noticed health benefits from moving out of a dorm style square apartment complex into a circular building made of natural materials and where I do not have neighbors living next to, behind, above, and below me.Has The Eden Alternative or The Green House Project been able to quantify the health benefits of their alternative living design vs. conventional senior housing complexes?Are there any senior communities which have used recycled building materials or energy efficient design to seriously to reduce costs?I dream of a network of permanent round buildings (each with framed out rooms) which connect via hallways to a central community building.  If the costs of a circular building are in fact less than the conventional method, this may be an opportunity for seniors to afford their own private residence at a similar cost per/ sq. ft. to facilities which use dorm/style housing.Remember fellow ChangingAging readers, in the words of Jana Dixon “The entrepreneur is the closest thing we have to a hero in the modern age, thus they engage the hero’s journey in their daily lives. The hero-entrepreneur has the courage and audacity to spin something from nothing…bringing greater value to themselves and society.”Related PostsOn The RoadI pulled out of the driveway, throttled up the engine, and stalled. The morning was cold and I was just starting to get used to the clutch of my new motorcycle. Soon, however, I was on my way. It was 7 in the morning and I was eager to begin…A Week Changing AgingImagine my surprise when I discovered that the December issue of The Magazine from AARP named me as one of the most influential people in America over age 50 “Changing Our Views on Aging.” In particular, they focused on my role as the founder of The Eden Alternative. Pretty cool.…Living-will Guide Doesn’t Ruffle VetsOur good friend Joseph Shapiro at NPR, who has done several stories on Bill’s Green House and Eden Alternative programs, gets to the bottom of the “death book” VA controversy. And no surprise, the Vets see right through the political B.S. Living-Will Guide For Vets Stirs Health Overhaul Fears A…Tweet7Share16Share5Email28 SharesTags: green house project Innovation senior housing The Eden Alternativelast_img read more

  • Scientists develop new device to test cancer drug combinations quickly and cheaply

    first_imgJun 22 2018Combinations of cancer drugs can be quickly and cheaply tested on tumor cells using a novel device developed by EMBL scientists. The research, reported in Nature Communications on June 22, marks the latest advancement in the field of personalized medicine. Using a microfluidic device that fits in the palm of your hand, scientists screened over 1100 treatment conditions (56 drug combinations x 20 replicates) on patient tumor cells. In the future, such tests could be used to inform clinicians on safe and effective combinations of cancer treatments. This research, incorporating fundamental science alongside clinical expertise at Aachen University Hospital, was led by EMBL group leader Christoph Merten and Julio Saez-Rodriguez, former group leader at EMBL-EBI and now Professor at Heidelberg University.Small biopsies, many drugsDirectly testing multiple cancer drugs on biopsies – parts of the tumor which have been taken from a patient – is a powerful way to discover which drugs work best, and for whom. This is because depending on the specific tumor characteristics, cancer therapies can be more effective in some people than others. However, large-scale patient specific drug screenings have so far been limited by the small biopsy size that can typically be obtained from patients. That is why in the current paper, the team developed a miniaturized device which can test more drugs on a limited number of cells.Tailored therapiesThe research team initially tested 56 drug combinations on two different human cancer cell types grown in the lab. Drug combinations which killed both types of cancer cells were thought to be potentially toxic and thus unsafe for further testing. However, some drug combinations which targeted and killed only one type of cancer cell were found to be more effective than standard clinical therapies which only use one drug. These results were highly reproducible and could be validated in mouse models of human cancer.Related StoriesNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerSubsequently, cells from four cancer patient biopsies were applied to the microfluidic device and different drug combinations were tested. “We found that each individual cancer responded best to a different combination of drugs, highlighting the urgent need for patient-specific therapies,” says Federica Eduati, joint first author on the paper alongside Ramesh Utharala who designed and developed the microfluidic device.”Before we transfer this technology into the clinics, we need to repeat these experiments in larger-scale mouse studies to understand which types of cancer this technology works best in,” says Christoph Merten. “Still, this is an exciting ‘proof of principle’ collaboration between scientists and clinicians, and we have shown that these tests can be run quickly and for less than $150 USD per patient.”What are Microfluidic devices?Microfluidic devices are plastic or glass ‘chips’ with microscopic wells and channels embedded within them. The current device relies on tiny programmable valves – usually used to print Braille – to open and close these channels in a highly controlled way. This means that tiny volumes of cells can be carefully pumped through the network of channels and be exposed to different drugs. Because of the small scale, hundreds of specific cell and drug mixtures can be combined in water droplets surrounded by oil and then sequentially ejected into long, thin plastic tubes, ready for analysis under the microscope. Source:https://www.embl.org/last_img read more

  • Childrens Colorado participates in cystic fibrosis triple combination therapy trials

    first_imgJun 29 2018Children’s Hospital Colorado (Children’s Colorado) has announced that its Mike McMorris Cystic Fibrosis Research and Care Center, one of the largest cystic fibrosis (CF) clinical care centers in the U.S., is participating in one of two Phase Three clinical trials related to the development of a possible breakthrough therapy for people with CF. Phase Three trials are generally the last round of trials before possible FDA approval of a new drug.The studies are examining the potential for two compounds – currently known as VX-659 and VX-445 – to be used as part of a triple combination modulator therapy for CF. CF is caused by a mutation in a single gene called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). The most common of these mutations is known as an F508del mutation. CFTR modulator therapies are designed to correct the malfunctioning protein made by the mutated CFTR gene.Related StoriesNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationSpecifically, Children’s Colorado is participating in the Phase Three study of VX-659 combined with tezacaftor/ivacaftor (SymdekoTM) for people with CF ages 12 years and older with one F508del mutation and another “minimal function” mutation. Currently, no CFTR modulator is available for this patient population.”Different mutations cause different defects in the protein produced by the CFTR gene, and the medications that have been developed so far – such as Orkambi®, Kalydeco ® and Symdeko™ – are effective only in people with specific mutations,” said Edith Zemanick, MD, pediatric pulmonologist at Children’s Colorado. “What is really exciting about these Phase Three trials is the prospect of developing a combination therapy to treat people with a single F508del mutation. This would mean that more people than ever before could benefit from modulator therapies.”The announcement of the Phase Three trials comes on the heels of the FDA’s approval of Symdeko (tezacaftor/ivacaftor) in February. The combination drug was approved for use in patients ages 12 and older with two copies of the F508del mutation or one of 26 other specified mutations, even if they do not have a copy of the F508del mutation. Children’s Colorado participated in some of the Phase Three trials of this drug and is currently conducting a study of the drug in children ages six to 11.”We have been involved in CF clinical trials with Children’s Colorado since our son was little,” said Libby Colbert, mother of Noah, 12, a patient at Children’s Colorado. “He started taking the drug right after its approval by the FDA, and we saw a difference almost immediately. The combination of tezacaftor and ivacaftor has been a great medicine for Noah and has helped him smell and breathe better. We are grateful to live close to a great hospital where Noah is receiving exceptional care and is among leaders in CF research. This is a great step for all those living with CF and we are excited for this milestone in medicine.” Source:https://www.childrenscolorado.org/about/news/2018/june-2018/cystic-fibrosis-trials/last_img read more

  • RaySearch introduces a new version of groundbreaking oncology information system

    first_imgThis latest release of RayCare takes important steps toward the goal of an OIS that supports and connects oncology workflows, and raises automation to new levels. By combining our technical innovation with the expertise of our clinical partners, we are redefining what is possible with an OIS.” Jul 17 2018RaySearch has released RayCare 2A, the latest version of its groundbreaking oncology information system (OIS). RayCare is designed to support the workflow in a modern oncology center, connecting the different oncology disciplines, boosting efficiency and ensuring optimal use of resources.RayCare is developing rapidly with clinical input from leading cancer centers worldwide. The first clinical version of RayCare was released in December 2017, and Iridium Cancer Network in Belgium started using it clinically after only two months. RayCare 2A introduces new features and a range of general system enhancements.Related StoriesRaySearch and Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG sign partnership agreement regarding brachytherapyMD Anderson and RaySearch partner to enhance cancer radiation therapyRabin Medical Center in Israel selects RayStation for radiation therapy treatment planningNew features include task-based and rule-based scheduling for all clinic resources, management of clinical documents and forms connected to task management, and additional treatment management functions. RayCare’s advanced workflow capabilities have been further enhanced to enable customization of the individual patient’s workflow, as well as automatic capture and management of billable codes from tasks performed in the workflow.RayCare 2A also incorporates RayPACS, a unique managed PACS (picture archiving and communication system) that makes it fast and easy to retrieve and share images. RayPACS is fully integrated with the RayCare workflow management system, enabling automated imaging workflows. All DICOM and non-DICOM objects relevant for radiation oncology can be stored, and rules for DICOM routing can be set up easily based on any DICOM tag.Johan Löf, CEO of RaySearch, says: Source:https://www.raysearchlabs.com/media/press/?year=2018&cisionid=2993546last_img read more

  • Amphetamine regimen does not improve poststroke motor recovery

    first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Aug 27 2018A pilot clinical trial exploring the benefit of d-amphetamine combined with physical therapy for stroke patients found no evidence that the regimen improved post-stroke motor recovery.The results, which were published in the August 27, 2018 issue of JAMA Neurology, are “another step to better understand an approach that may or may not eventually lead to a new way of improving recovery,” said Dr. Larry Goldstein, chairman of Neurology at the University of Kentucky and the study’s lead author.Amphetamines were first synthesized in 1887 by Romanian chemist Lazar Edeleanu, but it wasn’t until the late 1920’s that amphetamines were identified as a medically useful mood and energy booster. By World War II, soldiers were using amphetamines to combat fatigue and improve morale; the military routinely distributed the drug to pilots flying long missions. In the 1960’s, however, the medical community’s enthusiasm for the drug as a safe and popular remedy for depression and fatigue faded.Two decades later, the question came full circle when Sciencepublished the results of a complex, placebo-controlled study demonstrating that rats with brain injuries who were given amphetamines in conjunction with physical therapy showed notable improvement in motor function. Other studies in cats and mice suggested similar improvements.Since then, the scientific community has worked to extend these successes to humans and further define the parameters for optimal efficacy, e.g. dose, timing/frequency/intensity of physical therapy, but with inconsistent results.Goldstein et al aimed to further inform the debate. Their study screened 1665 ischemic stroke patients in five rehabilitation hospitals or inpatient units. Sixty-four participants were randomized to receive either 10mg of d-amphetamine or placebo combined with a one-hour physical therapy session every four days for six sessions, in addition to standard rehabilitation. Treatment began between ten and 30 days after ischemic stroke.Related StoriesStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeMeasuring blood protein levels in diabetic patients to predict risk of strokeThe primary outcome was defined as a difference in the change in Fugl-Meyer Motor scores, an impairment index assessing motor function, balance, and sensation. The study also assessed changes in the NIH-Stroke Scale, Canadian Neurological Scale, Action Research Arm test, Rankin Score, Functional Independence Measure, Ambulation Speed and Endurance, Mini Mental State examination, Beck Depression Index and the Stroke Impact Scale as secondary measures. Participants were tested at baseline, the end of treatment and again at three months post-stroke.Resulting data showed no overall treatment-related difference in Fugl-Meyer Motor scores between baseline and 3-month post-stroke in the two test groups (18.65+2.27 points with d-amphetamine vs. 20.83+2.94 points with placebo). The two groups were equally comparable on all secondary outcome measures as well, and there was no difference in subgroups based on stroke location or baseline severity.Goldstein said the next step is to explore other dosing regimens, treatment intervals and times between stroke and beginning treatment — all factors that are important based on animal studies.”The concept of using amphetamines as part of a regimen for stroke recovery is biologically complex, and this pilot was specifically designed to explore some of that complexity,” he said. “This data should help elucidate the parameters for continued study.” Source:http://www.uky.edu/last_img read more

  • Injection helps the immune system obliterate tumors at least in mice

    first_img Sagiv-Barfi et al./Science Translational Medicine Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Our immune cells can destroy tumors, but sometimes they need a kick in the pants to do the job. A study in mice describes a new way to incite these attacks by injecting an immune-stimulating mixture directly into tumors. The shots trigger the animals’ immune system to eliminate not only the injected tumors, but also other tumors in their bodies.“This is a very important study,” says immunologist Keith Knutson of the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who wasn’t connected to the research. “It provides a good pretext for going into humans.”To bring the wrath of the immune system down on tumors, researchers have tried shooting them up with a variety of molecules and viruses. So far, however, almost every candidate they’ve tested hasn’t worked in people. Email By Mitch LeslieJan. 31, 2018 , 2:00 PM Hoping to develop a more potent approach, medical oncologist Ron Levy of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and colleagues used mice to test the cancer-fighting capabilities of some 20 molecules, including several types of antibodies that activate immune cells. The researchers first induced tumors by inserting cancer cells just below the skin at two different locations on the animals’ abdomens. After tumors started growing at both sites, the scientists injected the molecules, alone or in combination, into one tumor in each mouse. They then tracked the responses of both tumors.A pair of molecules—a type of DNA snippet called CpG and an antibody against the immune cell protein OX40—produced the best results. “On their own, they do almost nothing, but the combination is synergistic,” Levy says. When the researchers injected the two molecules into mouse tumors, they disappeared in less than 10 days. In less than 20 days, the noninjected tumors had also vanished, the team reports online today in Science Translational Medicine.The two molecules rouse different immune cells. The DNA snippet stimulates dendritic cells, which help instigate counterattacks against tumors. OX40 functions as a throttle for T cells, another type of immune cell crucial for battling tumors, and the anti-OX40 antibodies rev up these cells.Levy and his colleagues also tested the approach in a strain of mouse prone to breast tumors. If the animals harbored two tumors, injecting the mixture into one tumor curbed the growth of the second. Moreover, the combo prevented any new breast tumors from appearing.“We think that this particular combination will be very effective in patients,” Levy says. He predicts that it could work against a variety of cancers. Because the combination destroys other tumors besides the injected one, it might eliminate metastases, or the secondary tumors that result when cancer spreads, he says.“The data is very impressive, particularly for the uninjected tumors,” says cancer immunologist Drew Pardoll of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy in Baltimore, Maryland, who wasn’t connected to the study. The researchers “deserve a lot of credit” for testing the approach in the mice that spontaneously develop breast tumors, he says, which more closely mimic how cancer arises in humans.The big question is whether the approach works in people, as most rodent cancer therapies don’t translate to humans. Levy and his colleagues are about to find out. They are launching a clinical trial to evaluate the safety of their approach and gauge its effectiveness in patients with lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system.center_img Injection helps the immune system obliterate tumors, at least in mice Tumors are growing on each side of this mouse’s body just behind its forelegs.  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

  • Researcher who created CRISPR twins defends his work but leaves many questions

    first_img HONG KONG, CHINA—The researcher who set off a global firestorm 2 days ago when he announced the birth of the world’s first gene-edited babies defended his study at a meeting here this morning. He Jiankui of the Southern University of Science and Technology in nearby Shenzhen, China, said he was “proud” of the work, which he said could lead to disease prevention “for millions of children,” and provided some details about the unpublished research that many scientists and bioethicists—as well as a phalanx of journalists—were clamoring to hear. Thousands around the world watched a webcast of his talk.He dropped another bombshell, acknowledging that a second woman is in the early stages of a pregnancy with a gene-edited embryo.But He, who used the genome-editing technique CRISPR in his attempt to make twin girls resistant to HIV infection, failed to provide many key details about the trial, was evasive about the ethical debate that had preceded the study, and provided sometimes confusing answers about the balance between risks and purported benefits. And his talk immediately triggered fresh criticism. The work should be “considered irresponsible,” biologist David Baltimore of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena said after hearing the presentation. “I don’t think it has been a transparent process, we only found out about it after it happened … after the children were born. I personally don’t think it was medically necessary,” Baltimore added, reflecting concerns that were widely voiced even before any details of the study had become available. “I think there has been a failure of self-regulation by the scientific community because of a lack of transparency.” Imaginechina via AP Images For this specific case, I feel proud, actually. I feel proudest because [the father] had lost hope for life. I think there has been a failure of self-regulation by the scientific community because of a lack of transparency. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country David Baltimore, California Institute of Technology The fact that it’s possible that the first instance of human germline editing came forward as a misstep, should in no way lead us to stick our heads in the sand. He’s talk took place at the International Summit on Human Genome Editing here, a global forum to discuss scientific progress and ethical issues in one of the most fraught areas of biomedical research. Earlier this week, He announced in an Associated Press (AP) interview and a series of YouTube videos that his team had engineered the genomes of twin baby girls to cripple a key receptor, CCR5, that HIV uses to infect white blood cells—a modification they may pass onto their descendants. George Daley, Harvard Medical School Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe He Jiankui, Southern University of Science and Technology Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The girls’ father is infected with HIV, but the purported justification for the study was not to protect the girls from the AIDS virus during pregnancy. The parents used in vitro fertilization and the father’s sperm was washed to remove HIV, which virtually eliminated the risk of the embryos being infected. He’s goal was to protect them later in life, he told AP, even though experts agree there are other safe and effective ways to prevent acquiring HIV.The news completely dominated discussions at the summit even before He appeared; to accommodate the sudden interest, a special 1-hour time slot was carved out for He today. The hall was filled to capacity; hundreds of videographers, photographers, and journalists crammed shoulder-to-shoulder into one area. “I have the right to just cancel the session if there’s too much noise or interruption,” moderator Robin Lovell-Badge of The Francis Crick Institute in London warned at the outset. When He started his talk, clicking shutters nearly drowned him out, prompting Lovell-Badge to repeat his warning.He started by apologizing for the way his claims “leaked unexpectedly” earlier this week; he said a paper has been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. (News of the breakthrough was first reported by MIT Technology Review, after which AP released a story about the work, and He made the YouTube videos and several documents related to the experiment public.)He also justified his research target, explaining that HIV/AIDS still imposes a heavy disease burden on much of Africa, and those infected often face severe discrimination. Mutations in the CCR5 gene confer HIV resistance, and He said previous experiments have suggested CCR5 was a promising target for editing. But He didn’t explain how gene editing could help the world prevent the disease; nobody thinks it’s feasible to edit the genomes of entire populations.He outlined how he took his research from work in mice to nonhuman primates to human embryos in vitro—much of which, he pointed out, he had presented at previous talks. Then he added some details about the human studies. A large focus of his research was on optimizing the precision with which CRISPR cuts the genome to minimize the possibility of untargeted genes being altered.He recruited couples that wanted to start a family in which the man was infected with HIV and the woman was not. There was a two-step informed consent process with a team member first visiting the couple at their home, and then a discussion of an hour or more at He’s lab in Shenzhen. In the case of the couple that eventually produced the twins, He collected eggs from the woman, injected them each with a sperm cell from her husband, and soon after used CRISPR in attempts to modify four of the resulting embryos. In one, both copies of the CCR5 gene were disrupted; in another, CRISPR only crippled one of the copies, leaving one copy of the gene intact. The couple agreed to have both of these embryos implanted and both resulted in live births.In the wide-ranging Q&A that followed, Lovell-Badge noted that the CCR5 gene has multiple functions in the immune system, that its absence leaves individuals more at risk for West Nile virus and potentially other diseases. Did He “really know enough about CCR5 and its role in the immune system to choose that for therapy?” Lovell-Badge asked. He responded that his team chose CCR5 because it is a well-understood single gene target appropriate for a first trial before moving to multiple-gene diseases. But he didn’t address the question of potential inadvertent side effects.“I just don’t see an unmet medical need for these girls,” said David Liu, a biochemist at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The technology could benefit millions of children potentially exposed to HIV from their parents, He said, without explaining this further. Speaking about the babies, he added, somewhat cryptically: “For this specific case, I feel proud. I feel proudest, because Mark, [the babies’ HIV-infected father], had lost hope for life. But with this protection, he sent a message saying he will work hard, earn money, and take care of his two daughters and his wife for this life.” He did not address the fact that safe and effective ways to prevent HIV transmission exist, or why gene editing might be preferable. Researcher who created CRISPR twins defends his work but leaves many questions unanswered Email This set a pattern for the rest of the Q&A: He answered some questions but left many partially unanswered—or didn’t give an answer at all. He went off on a tangent when asked directly why he had chosen to conduct a study that international scientific consensus said shouldn’t be done. He was vague about whether the study had been approved by an institutional review board. He said he is personally paying for the medical expenses of the study participants, but didn’t say how much or whether he can continue that support long-term. It’s still unclear where he conducted the lab work and which hospital was involved.Questions from the floor indicated widespread dissatisfaction with his answers on his informed consent procedures. He said four people had reviewed the consent form before it was given to the couples; in the United States, “hundreds of people would review a consent form” before it would be put into use, says Matthew Porteus, a pediatric stem cell researcher at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. Although He’s outline of his work overall indicated a “reasonable approach,” in going from mice to nonhuman primates to humans, Porteus adds, “there are still gaps” in the information provided, such as details on how many eggs were used, the success rate in the gene modification step, whether there had been any miscarriages, and the date of the births.In addition, “There are questions about the secrecy,” Porteus says. For instance, He claimed that he had discussed his work at several conferences. “But I was at those conferences and He didn’t indicate he was moving in this direction.” Unless He produces more information and better answers, “he risks becoming a pariah,” Porteus says. He Jiankui (center) during a Q&A after his presentation in Hong Kong, China, today; he was joined by meeting co-organizer Robin Lovell-Badge (left) and pediatric stem cell researcher Matthew Porteus (right). By Dennis NormileNov. 28, 2018 , 9:30 AM Later in the day, the meeting’s organizers said He had withdrawn from a planned breakout session on embryo and germline editing to take place Thursday.With pending investigations by national and local authorities and his university, He’s saga is set to roil the scientific and biomedical community for months or even years to come. What impact his go-it-alone approach may have on the field remains to be seen. Appearing at the summit in the morning session, before He’s presentation, George Daley of Harvard Medical School in Boston expressed concern but urged researchers to have faith in the self-regulation of the research community while acknowledging that this requires transparency and external oversight.“The fact that it’s possible that the first instance of human germline editing came forward as a misstep, should in no way lead us to stick our heads in the sand,” Daley said. Rather than go on the defensive, he proposed “that it’s time for us to at least consider a responsible pathway for clinical translation” of germline editing.With reporting by Jon Cohen.*Update, 28 November, 2 p.m.: This story has been updated with additional information.last_img read more